Radishes

With its peppery, almost spicy flavor, radishes may not be one of the most popular garden vegetables, but they are one of the most nutritious. And they make a striking addition to salads and side dishes. For centuries, radishes have been used in Ayurvedic Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat fever, sore throat, bile disorders, inflammation, and bacterial and fungal conditions.

Radishes are an excellent source of immunity-boosting Vitamin C. Other plant chemicals in rashies act as antioxidants, which are known for reducing risk for cancer, heart disease, and other chronic illnesses. Several phytochemicals in radishes contain antibacterial and antifungal properties. One antifungal protein is RsAFP2. In research, RsAFP2 caused cell death in Candida albicans, a common fungus normally found in humans, which, when overgrown may cause vaginal yeast infections, oral yeast infections (thrush), and invasive candidiasis.

Radishes are root vegetables from the Brassica family. Close relatives of the radish include broccoli, kale, cauliflower, and turnips to name a few. Radish bulbs, also called globes, come in many shapes and colors. The most popular variety in the United States resembles an amethyst colored golf ball with a small tail. Other varieties are white, purple, or black. They may be larger and oblong in shape. Lighter-colored varieties, including the winter daikon radish, have a milder taste. Radishes become overly pungent if they are left in the ground too long or not eaten right away. For the best flavor and texture, select smaller globes.

There are many ways to enjoy radishes and boost the nutrient power of your meals and snacks:

  • Add thin radish slices to sandwiches
  • Add grated radishes to coleslaw
  • Add zest and crunch to tuna salad by adding 1 to 2 teaspoons of chopped radishes
  • Top your steak, burger, or veggie burger with grilled radish slices
  • Use radishes as a healthy crudité for dips
  • Roast or grill radishes with garlic, herbs, olive oil or other healthy fat

References

The information offered by this newsletter is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this newsletter.

Garlic Roasted Radishes

Bring out the sweetness, and maximize the health benefits of radishes, by roasting this jewel-hued veggie in garlic. Roasting draws out a mildly sweet juice that tempers the peppery flavor of rashishes. The garlic and butter (or ghee, if you prefer) blend perfectly with this hidden sweetness, giving the roasted radish a delectable aroma and flavor. Enjoy these over salads, served as a side dish to a roasted or grilled main course, or as a snack.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. radishes, ends trimmed and halved
  • 1 Tbsp. melted ghee or butter (vegan option: use coconut oil or avocado oil)
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 1/4 tsp. dried parsley, dried chives or dried dill

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. In a bowl, combine the radishes, melted ghee or butter, salt and pepper and toss until radishes are evenly coated. Save adding the minced garlic until just before the radishes are done roasting.
  3. Spread radishes out in a large 9×13 inch baking dish. Don’t over crowd.
  4. Bake for 20-25 minutes, tossing every 10 or so minutes. 
  5. Add the minced garlic and dried parsley and bake for an additional 5 minutes or until radishes are golden brown and cooked through.

Optional: Serve with a side of ranch dressing for dipping or drizzle on top and garnish with parsley, dill or chives.

References

The information offered by this newsletter is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this newsletter.